Miss Pymbrokes Rules

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Rules of snooker

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The table usually has a slate base, covered in green baize. No, cancel Yes, report it Thanks! She had made it to Weymouth. Not hitting the ball "on" first is the most common foul. You know that reading Miss Pymbroke S Rules Stevens Rosemary is effective, because we could get information in the reading materials.

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ISBN 13: 9780451132734

If you want to purchase one of these libraries, you will have to find independent eBook shops. These independent eBook shops typically package the e book libraries by genre, plus have a wide selection of genres. The objective of the game of snooker is to strike the white cue ball with a cue so that it strikes the object balls in turn and causes them to fall into one of the six pockets. Points are scored for potting balls legally, in accordance with the rules described below, or in the event of a foul committed by the opponent.

The player who scores more points wins the frame, and the first player to win a set number of frames wins the match. A match usually consists of a fixed, odd number of frames. A frame begins with setting up the balls as described above. A frame ends when all balls are potted, or when one of the players concedes defeat because that player is too far behind in score to equal or beat the score of the other player.

A match ends when one player has won enough frames to make it impossible for the other player to catch up. For example, in a match of 19 frames, the first player to win 10 of them is the victor. At the beginning of each frame, the balls are set up by the referee as explained. One player then takes a break-off shot , placing the cue ball anywhere inside the D and attempting to hit one or more of the red balls. It is common for players to start by placing the ball on the line, between the brown ball and either the green or yellow ball.

The break-off alternates between players on successive frames.

Only one player may visit the table at a time. A break is the number of points scored by a player in one single visit to the table. A player's turn and break end when he or she fails to pot a ball or does something against the rules of the game called a foul , or when a frame has ended. The ball or balls that can be hit first by the white are called the ball s "on" for that particular stroke. The ball s "on" differ from shot to shot: a red ball, if potted, must be followed by a colour, a potted colour must be followed by a red, and so on until a break ends.

If a red is not potted, any red ball remains the ball "on" for the opponent's first shot. Only a ball or balls "on" may be potted legally by a player; potting a ball not "on" constitutes a foul. All of the reds are "on" for the break-off shot. If the cue ball comes to rest in direct contact with a ball that is on or could be on, the referee shall declare a "touching ball.

If the object ball moves, it is considered a "push shot" and a foul shall be called. No penalty is incurred for playing away if 1 the ball is on; 2 the ball could be on and the striker nominates such ball; or 3 the ball could be on and the striker nominates, and first hits, another ball that could be on.

If the cue ball is touching another ball which could not be on e.

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Where the cue ball is simultaneously touching several balls that are on or could be on, the referee shall indicate that each and every one of them is a touching ball; the striker must therefore play away from all of them. The striker scores no points for balls potted as the result of a foul. Depending on the situation, these balls will either remain off the table; be returned to their original spots; or be replaced in the positions they occupied before the foul shot, along with any other balls that were moved during the shot.

For details on such situations, see Fouls below. Each frame of snooker generally consists of two phases. The first phase lasts as long as any red balls remain on the table. During this phase, all red balls are "on" for the beginning of a player's turn; the player must therefore first hit and attempt to pot one or more of them. If the player either commits a foul or fails to pot a red, the turn ends and the opponent begins to play. Each legally potted red ball awards one point and remains off the table until the end of the frame.

The player continues his or her turn by nominating one of the six colours yellow, green, brown, blue, pink, black as the ball "on" for the next shot. The rules of the game indicate that the player must state the desired colour to the referee, although it is usually clear which ball the player is attempting to pot, making a formal nomination unnecessary.

Potting the nominated colour awards further points two through seven, in the same order as the preceding paragraph. The referee then removes the colour from the pocket and replaces it on the table in its original spot. If that spot is covered by another ball, the ball is placed on the highest available spot. If all spots are occupied, it is placed as close to its own spot as possible in a direct line between that spot and the top cushion, without touching another ball. If there is no room this side of the spot, it will be placed as close to the spot as possible in a straight line towards the bottom cushion, without touching another ball.

The player then resumes play, with the red balls "on" again. Because only one of the colours can be "on" at any given time, it is a foul to first hit multiple colours at the same time, or pot more than one colour unless a free ball has been awarded, see below. If a player fails to pot a ball "on", whether a red or a nominated colour, the other player will come to the table, with the reds always being the balls "on" as long as there are still reds on the table.

The alternation between red balls and colours ends when all reds have been potted and a colour is potted after the last red, or a failed attempt to do so is made. All six colours have then to be potted in ascending order of their value yellow, green, brown, blue, pink, black. Each becomes the ball "on" in that order. During this phase, the colours are not replaced on the table after being legally potted; however, any colour potted as the result of a foul is re-spotted.

After all six colours have been potted, the player with the higher score wins the frame but see below for end-of-frame scenarios. A foul is a shot or action by the striker which is against the rules of the game. Common fouls are: [2] [3]. If the cue ball is potted or leaves the table, the opponent receives it "in-hand" and may then place it anywhere within the "D" for the next shot. It is sometimes erroneously believed that potting two or more balls in one shot is an automatic foul.

This is only true if one of the potted balls is not "on" e. When the reds are "on", two or more of them may be legally potted in the same shot and are worth one point each; however, the player may only nominate and attempt to pot one colour on the next shot.

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If a free ball has been granted see below , a colour may be legally potted in the same shot as a red or another colour, depending on the circumstances. Should a cue ball be touched with the tip while "in-hand", i. The following fouls award seven points to the opponent when committed: [1]. Any other foul awards points to the opponent equal to the value of the ball "on," the highest value of all balls involved in the foul, or four points, whichever is highest.

If multiple fouls are committed in one shot, only the penalty for the highest-valued foul is scored.

The penalty for a foul is thus no lower than four points and no higher than seven. Not hitting the ball "on" first is the most common foul. A common defensive tactic is to play a shot that leaves the opponent unable to hit a ball "on" directly. Because players receive points for fouls by their opponents, repeatedly snookering one's opponent is a possible way of winning a frame when potting all the balls on the table would be insufficient to ensure a win or tie.

This portion of the frame is known as the "snookers-required" stage. A free ball is a player-nominated substitute for the ball "on" when a player becomes snookered as the result of a foul committed by the opponent.

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Once the free ball shot is taken legally, the game continues normally; however, if the player who committed the foul is asked to play again, a free ball is not granted. For example, as illustrated in the provided picture, if the ball on is the final red, but is snookered by the black due to a foul, the player will be able to name the blue as the free ball.

The player could then pot the blue as if it were a red for one point. The blue will then be respotted, a nominated colour ball will be on, and normal play will resume. As a natural corollary of the rules, the free ball is always a colour ball. If the ball on is a red, then by definition it cannot be snookered via another red, as it merely provides an alternative clean shot with another ball on. If the ball on is a red, and is snookered by a colour after a foul, then logically the red is either the final one or all reds are snookered by a colour ball, meaning the free ball has to be a colour.

If the ball on is a colour ball that is snookered by a red, a previous red must have been successfully potted; the snooker therefore must be self-inflicted and cannot have occurred as the result of a foul. If the ball on is a colour that is snookered by another colour after a foul, all reds must have been already potted; thus the free ball still has to be a colour ball. Interesting situations could occur if somehow both the free ball and the real ball on are potted. If a colour were the ball on all reds were potted , and both the free ball and the actual ball on are potted, only the ball on is scored.